Creative Energy in Human Form

I am creative energy in human form. I believe that the power of a community lies in their level of self-awareness and that the media has a very large impact on this. We are at a very unique, exciting time in history where the internet has afforded us the ability to pursue knowledge without limits, create and publish our own content and to freely and instantly communicate with each other.

All is Not Well With Our Girls: When Suicide Hits Close to Home

Karyn’s story strikes a painful cord for me, although admittedly, one with a much different ending. In 2012, my then 13-year-old former mentee shared with me her suicide attempt. She invited me to her home, showed me the healed scars on her wrists and explained that she wanted to end her life because she’d grown tired of not feeling pretty and being teased about her dark skin and course hair.  Her story literally changed the trajectory of my life.


Thankfully, Alisha is receiving treatment and is coming along well. But I would later discover that there are many girls of color suffering with depression, bipolar disorder, bulimia and other image disorders. They cut themselves, engage in risky behaviors and yes, they sometimes commit suicide. Mental health issues, along with the lack of proper treatment, underdiagnoses and the stigma it often carries, is a very serious problem in the Black community.  And this is especially true for our young women and girls.  A recent study conducted by the African American Policy Forum revealed that Black girls have higher incidence of emotional difficulties than other girls, including signs of depression. A separate national study found that 67% of Black girls indicated that they felt sad or hopeless for two or more weeks straight, compared to 31% of white girls and 40% of Latina girls.

Creating a platform for girls and young women to tell their own stories - stories of triumph and pain - is the reason I started Black Girls Unscripted. It’s the reason amazing volunteers lend their time and talent to this work. And it’s the reason we work tirelessly to grow this much needed movement.”

sourcedumal:

thepeoplesrecord:

Pre-school-to-Prison Pipeline: Studies confirm the dehumanization of Black childrenApril 6, 2014
Although African-Americans constitute only 13 percent of all Americans, nearly half of all prison inmates in the U.S. are black. This startling statistic has led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to publicly criticize the U.S. for its treatment of African-Americans. A number of recent studies and reports paint a damning picture of how American society dehumanizes blacks starting from early childhood.
Racial justice activists and prison abolition groups have long argued that the “school-to-prison” pipeline funnels young black kids into the criminal justice system, with higher rates of school suspension and arrest compared with nonblack kids for the same infractions. More than 20 years ago, Smith College professor Ann Arnett Ferguson wrote a groundbreaking book based on her three-year study of how black boys in particular are perceived differently starting in school. In “Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity,” Ferguson laid out the ways in which educators and administrators funneled black male students into the juvenile justice system based on perceived differences between them and other students.
Today this trend continues with record numbers of suspensions as a result of “zero-tolerance” school policies and the increasing presence of campus police officers who arrest students for insubordination, fights and other types of behavior that might be considered normal “acting out” in school-aged children. In fact, black youth are far more likely to be suspended from school than any other race. They also face disproportionate expulsion and arrest rates, and once children enter the juvenile justice system they are far more likely to be incarcerated as adults.
Even the Justice Department under President Obama has understood what a serious problem this is, issuing a set of new guidelines earlier this year to curb discriminatory suspension in school
But it turns out that negative disciplinary actions affect African-American children starting as early as age 3. The U.S. Department of Education just released a comprehensive study of public schools, revealing in a report that black children face discrimination even in preschool. (That preschool-aged children are suspended at all is hugely disturbing.) Data from the 2011-2012 year show that although black children make up only 18 percent of preschoolers, 42 percent of them were suspended at least once and 48 percent were suspended multiple times.
Consistent with this educational data and taking into account broader demographic, family and economic data for children of various races, broken down by state, is a newer study released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation that found African-American children are on the lowest end of nearly every measured index including proficiency in math and reading, high school graduation, poverty and parental education. The report, titled Race for Results, plainly says, “The index scores for African-American children should be considered a national crisis.”
Two other studies published recently offer specific evidence of how black children are so disadvantaged at an early age. One research project, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, examined how college students and police officers estimated the ages of children who they were told had committed crimes. Both groups studied by UCLA professor Phillip Goff and collaborators were more likely to overestimate the ages of black children compared with nonblack ones, implying that black children were seen as “significantly less innocent” than others. The authors wrote:

We expected … that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses … and converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers.

Another study by researchers at UC Riverside found that teachers tended to be more likely to evaluate black children negatively than nonblack ones who were engaged in pretend play. Psychology professor Tuppett M. Yates, who led the study, observed 171 preschool-aged children interacting with stuffed toys and other props and evaluated them for how imaginative and creative they were. In an interview on Uprising, Yates told me that all the children, regardless of race, were “similarly imaginative and similarly expressive,” but when their teachers evaluated those same children at a later time, there was a discriminatory effect. Yates explained, “For white children, imaginative and expressive players were rated very positively [by teachers] but the reverse was true for black children. Imaginative and expressive black children were perceived as less ready for school, as less accepted by their peers, and as greater sources of conflict and tension.”
Full article

Age. Fucking. 3
That is the age in which our children are being indoctrinated
And you wonder why we are so fucked?

I have no idea why parents continue to enroll their children in public schools tbh.  There are plenty of other options out there.  

sourcedumal:

thepeoplesrecord:

Pre-school-to-Prison Pipeline: Studies confirm the dehumanization of Black children
April 6, 2014

Although African-Americans constitute only 13 percent of all Americansnearly half of all prison inmates in the U.S. are black. This startling statistic has led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to publicly criticize the U.S. for its treatment of African-Americans. A number of recent studies and reports paint a damning picture of how American society dehumanizes blacks starting from early childhood.

Racial justice activists and prison abolition groups have long argued that the “school-to-prison” pipeline funnels young black kids into the criminal justice system, with higher rates of school suspension and arrest compared with nonblack kids for the same infractions. More than 20 years ago, Smith College professor Ann Arnett Ferguson wrote a groundbreaking book based on her three-year study of how black boys in particular are perceived differently starting in school. In “Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity,” Ferguson laid out the ways in which educators and administrators funneled black male students into the juvenile justice system based on perceived differences between them and other students.

Today this trend continues with record numbers of suspensions as a result of “zero-tolerance” school policies and the increasing presence of campus police officers who arrest students for insubordination, fights and other types of behavior that might be considered normal “acting out” in school-aged children. In fact, black youth are far more likely to be suspended from school than any other race. They also face disproportionate expulsion and arrest rates, and once children enter the juvenile justice system they are far more likely to be incarcerated as adults.

Even the Justice Department under President Obama has understood what a serious problem this is, issuing a set of new guidelines earlier this year to curb discriminatory suspension in school

But it turns out that negative disciplinary actions affect African-American children starting as early as age 3. The U.S. Department of Education just released a comprehensive study of public schools, revealing in a report that black children face discrimination even in preschool. (That preschool-aged children are suspended at all is hugely disturbing.) Data from the 2011-2012 year show that although black children make up only 18 percent of preschoolers, 42 percent of them were suspended at least once and 48 percent were suspended multiple times.

Consistent with this educational data and taking into account broader demographic, family and economic data for children of various races, broken down by state, is a newer study released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation that found African-American children are on the lowest end of nearly every measured index including proficiency in math and reading, high school graduation, poverty and parental education. The report, titled Race for Results, plainly says, “The index scores for African-American children should be considered a national crisis.”

Two other studies published recently offer specific evidence of how black children are so disadvantaged at an early age. One research project, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, examined how college students and police officers estimated the ages of children who they were told had committed crimes. Both groups studied by UCLA professor Phillip Goff and collaborators were more likely to overestimate the ages of black children compared with nonblack ones, implying that black children were seen as “significantly less innocent” than others. The authors wrote:

We expected … that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses … and converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers.

Another study by researchers at UC Riverside found that teachers tended to be more likely to evaluate black children negatively than nonblack ones who were engaged in pretend play. Psychology professor Tuppett M. Yates, who led the study, observed 171 preschool-aged children interacting with stuffed toys and other props and evaluated them for how imaginative and creative they were. In an interview on Uprising, Yates told me that all the children, regardless of race, were “similarly imaginative and similarly expressive,” but when their teachers evaluated those same children at a later time, there was a discriminatory effect. Yates explained, “For white children, imaginative and expressive players were rated very positively [by teachers] but the reverse was true for black children. Imaginative and expressive black children were perceived as less ready for school, as less accepted by their peers, and as greater sources of conflict and tension.”

Full article

Age. Fucking. 3

That is the age in which our children are being indoctrinated

And you wonder why we are so fucked?

I have no idea why parents continue to enroll their children in public schools tbh.  There are plenty of other options out there.  

(via wakeupblackpower)

mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.

(via wakeupblackpower)

playcousin:

ok so over the past couple of days I have a large amount of questions concerning the screen caps and gifs I reblogged. Here is the English Version of the French classic.

Kirikou and the Sorceress (French: Kirikou et la Sorcière) is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed byMichel Ocelot. Drawn from elements of West African folk tales,[4] it depicts how a newborn boy, Kirikou, saves his village from the evil witch Karaba. The film was originally released on December 9, 1998.[5] It is a co-production between companies in France(Exposure, France 3 Cinema, Les Armateurs, Monipoly, Odec Kid Cartoons), Belgium (Radio-Television Belge) and Luxembourg(Studio O, Trans Europe Film) and animated at Rija Films’ studio in Latvia and Studio Exist in Hungary.[1][5]

It was so successful that it was followed by a midquel, Kirikou et les bêtes sauvages, released in 2005, and adapted into a stagemusical, Kirikou et Karaba, first performed in 2007.[6] Another midquel, Kirikou et les hommes et les femmes, was released in late 2012.[2]

OMG I’m in love with this movie!!  Such a good story with a positive message.

(via playcousin-deactivated20140410)

Western corporations carve up Africa

Huge tracts of land in African countries with access to the sea and high economic growth are being targeted by corporations such as Monsanto and Unilever with help from the British and American governments –including millions of dollars that are intended for helping the poor, says a report published today by UK campaigning group World Development Movement.

The document, titled Carving up a continent: How the UK government is facilitating the corporate takeover of African food systems, explains that a G8 initiative called the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition is using money intended for poverty reduction to instead ease access to key African locations for some of the world’s biggest companies, which already control much of the global food market.”

Doublespeak and the new “scramble for Africa”

What’s more, the New Alliance agreements signed with ten key African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Tanzania) are conditional, and many of them require the country in question to bring legislation – for example, revising seed laws to force small farmers to buy seeds and fertilisers from the corporates rather than seed sharing, which has been practised for generations and ensures biodiversity.

Under the new paradigm, multinationals gain access to fertile land and agricultural corridors on the pretext of tackling food poverty and helping Africa’s starving and needy. In reality this is doublespeak. If the New Alliance continues unchecked, it’s likely that problems are stored up for the future, as small scale and family farmers are forced off their land to make way for industrial scale crop production. WDM also identifies issues such as insecure and poorly paid jobs and a focus on producing for export markets rather than to feed local populations.”

Campaigners representing the New Alliance multinationals carve and eat up Africa. Why no protests anywhere in Africa? Because most of us are oblivious to what’s being done behind our backs, is the simple answer”

“The tragic consequences of small-scale farmers’ reliance on fertilisers in India have been much reported. An estimated 250,000 farmers committed suicide between 1995 and 2010 after getting into debt through buying agrochemicals.”

Repost and reblog!!  This is being done behind the backs of the African people.  Monsanto has already met resistance from many European countries who do not want to buy and eat their GMO crap, so they are targeting developing, vulnerable nations in Africa.  This will hurt the people there and create even more problems and poverty.  Please get the word out about this!!

Mugabe revives Gaddafi's United States of Africa dream

Such was the dream of Muammar Gaddafi, a quixotic project that appeared to have died with the Libyan dictator but has now been rekindled by the Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe.

Speaking in Harare after meeting Benin’s president, Thomas Boni Yayi, who is the outgoing African Union (AU) chairman, Mugabe argued that a figurehead is needed to move Africa beyond regional blocs and into the global superleague.

"Get them to get out of the regional shell and get into one continental shell," he was quoted as saying by the state-owned Herald newspaper.

"The continent of Africa: this is what we must become. And there, we must also have an African head. He was talking of the president of Africa. Yes, we need one. We are not yet there.

"This is what we must go and discuss, but we must also discuss the issues that divide us."

Should parents give children traditional African names? | The Voice Online

atane:

prepaidafrica:

Historian says it’s time to ditch European or ‘Christian’ names

Attempting to inspire change through ‘Araning’ - the act of giving one’s self or someone else an African name in order to unequivocally assert their African heritage – campaign, history consultant Kwaku explains why parents should consider getting on board.

Why should a child have an African name?

Coming from a historical perspective, African global participation in society and civilisation to date has always been hidden, downgraded or denigrated. Within this context, it’s important to easily recognise the positive contributions made by Africans. One way of doing this, in the absence of an image, is an African name.

What power lies behind calling an African name?

The power of calling and hearing an African name is the upliftment of racial and self-esteem. At a time when there are so many negative stereotypes, which makes many people of African heritage in the diaspora ashamed of, and disengaged from, Africa, an African name can reaffirm our heritage and connection to the Motherland.

How are African names inspired? Do different nations create their name in their own way?

Certainly in Ghana, in regards to the Akan peoples and those who’ve adopted their system, there is the Day name which is a set of names for boys and girls born on a specific day of the week. For example, I’m called Kwaku (others spell it Kweku), because I’m a male born on Wednesday.

Names can be based on the family, clan, or tribe you come from, your order of birth within a family, being part of a set of twins. Names can relate to a family’s wishes for a newborn, such as naming them after a prosperous uncle or a characteristic such as ‘he who brings peace’. Names can also relate to a trade, locality or social position.

The Gas (singular is Ga), which is the tribe I come from found mainly in the capital Accra, have always had a rigid rule for naming children based on family, clan, etc. However the concept of day name is an Akan concept borrowed/adopted/adapted by Gas and now very prevalent.

I’ll share my perspective through the eyes of my parents.

People from my parents’ generation in Nigeria mostly had anglophone names. My dad’s name is Nicholas and my mom’s name is Fredrica. All their siblings had anglophone names like Emily, Reginald, Geoffrey, Cordelia, Dorothy and so on. That was just how colonialism worked. Their names were devalued by the British, and anglophone names were seen as “proper”.

My parents were young adults in a time when independence was sweeping the African continent. There was great pride and resistance against colonialism and colonialist ideals, especially among young academics like my parents. They decided long before we were born that they would give all of us indigenous names. They rejected anglophone names entirely. Reclaiming your identity via your name was a form of resistance in their eyes. It was very important to them, and when my sisters got married and had their children, they asked our parents for suggestions for traditional names for their grandkids as a sign of respect and honor.

My full name is Atane Gogonte Dimpka Ofiaja.

Atane means ‘Good Man’ in the Obolo language.

Others from my parents’ generation took what they considered to be a pragmatic approach and gave their children both indigenous and anglophone names.

Ultimately, this is a personal decision. Whatever a parent decides, know that our names are always beautiful and worthy.

(via yagazieemezi)

shareawakening:

By @randysimpson_ “So excited! This wave has been brewing since ‘08’ known since before the 60’s get ready to rise & surf the biggest wave of life itself…it’s called LOVE Living.Oneness.Vibrating.Energy Its power unites greater than any divide that has ever stood! This will be the biggest rise & fall in history as the greatest love story of humanity uniting with the help of our solar system. From a universal vibration of 3D to 13 sphere get ready to ride…this wave is off thy ricta, it’s the cardinal grand crossing, the quantum leap of awakening to a foundation that is solid in love, compassion & unity. Love is the energy, not an art form & Quantum science is now proving it! This is one astrological dance that is centre stage & will be ever so beautiful to watch in the sky as well as feel within… Sunsets & sunrises will take heaven on earth to greater heights! Enjoy the greeting of the Wave of LOVE! If you have been feeling like you have been experiencing a “menstural cycle” of your lifetime this is why ladies & gents 😜 the energetics of emotions & mental patterns are high flying with colour! To remain centred focus on the heart of you, with the heart of earth & the heart of our galactic with your breath, move with it & empower your ground as your highest sense of self. Happy LOVE Dancing, From Heart, Through Earth ❤️💃❤️ #science #art #love #astrology #change #WaveOfAction #itsalifeworthsurfing #surf #yoga #meditation #dance #reiki #energy #healing #planets” via @PhotoRepost_app

shareawakening:

By @randysimpson_ “So excited! This wave has been brewing since ‘08’ known since before the 60’s get ready to rise & surf the biggest wave of life itself…it’s called LOVE Living.Oneness.Vibrating.Energy Its power unites greater than any divide that has ever stood! This will be the biggest rise & fall in history as the greatest love story of humanity uniting with the help of our solar system. From a universal vibration of 3D to 13 sphere get ready to ride…this wave is off thy ricta, it’s the cardinal grand crossing, the quantum leap of awakening to a foundation that is solid in love, compassion & unity. Love is the energy, not an art form & Quantum science is now proving it! This is one astrological dance that is centre stage & will be ever so beautiful to watch in the sky as well as feel within… Sunsets & sunrises will take heaven on earth to greater heights! Enjoy the greeting of the Wave of LOVE! If you have been feeling like you have been experiencing a “menstural cycle” of your lifetime this is why ladies & gents 😜 the energetics of emotions & mental patterns are high flying with colour! To remain centred focus on the heart of you, with the heart of earth & the heart of our galactic with your breath, move with it & empower your ground as your highest sense of self. Happy LOVE Dancing, From Heart, Through Earth ❤️💃❤️ #science #art #love #astrology #change #WaveOfAction #itsalifeworthsurfing #surf #yoga #meditation #dance #reiki #energy #healing #planets” via @PhotoRepost_app

spaceadmiraldee:

On April 30, Emory University will be offering a free online course on The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Nubia.

The class will reveal one of the most dynamic, yet little known cultures of the ancient world. It will explore the geography and archaeology of Nubia, Egypt’s neighbor to the south and home to a series of remarkable and innovative civilizations. It will cover the period from the earliest inhabitants of the Nile Valley (Paleolithic through Neolithic and domestication of plants and animals), and continue until the advent of Christianity.

The class is a combination of video lectures from five to 20 minutes in length with images of sites and objects along with maps and plans. There will also be some film clips as well. There will be homework-style quizzes to help students measure learning and explore the materials in more depth. There are several extra credit options, and there will be a final exam at the end of the course.

The course will last a total of 8 weeks and is taught in English with English subtitles. There will be a verified certificate of completion at the end of the course. Peter Lacovara, Senior Curator of Ancient Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art at Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University will be teaching the class.

(via thefemaletyrant)

assholeofday:

Judge Jan Jurden, Asshole of the Day for March 31, 2014
by TeaPartyCat (Follow @TeaPartyCat)
What would it take to keep a man out of prison after he raped his 3-year-old daughter?
The answer should of course be NOTHING. But apparently is “lots and lots of inherited money”. Or at least that’s  Judge Jan Jurden’s answer:

A Superior Court judge who sentenced an heir to the du Pont fortune to probation for raping his 3-year-old daughter wrote in her order that he “will not fare well” in prison and suggested that he needed treatment instead of time behind bars, according to Delaware Online.
Court records show that in Judge Jan Jurden’s sentencing order for Robert H. Richards IV she considered unique circumstances when deciding his punishment for fourth-degree rape. Her observation that prison life would adversely affect Richards confused several criminal justice authorities in Delaware, who said that her view that treatment was a better idea than prison is typically used when sentencing drug addicts, not child rapists.
Jurden gave Richards, who had no previous criminal record, an eight-year prison term, but suspended all the prison time for probation.
“Defendant will not fare well in Level 5 [prison] setting,” she wrote in her order.

Someone who molests his own 3-year-old has a problem. And ignoring what justice demands here, or how unevenly it is enforced between rich and poor, or even between rich and anyone else, there’s a safety issue. Someone with this problem needs to be locked up and not released until there’s some reason to believe he no longer poses a threat to children. Oh, sure, it’s nice to insist on treatment, but what’s to stop him from molesting more children while he’s under treatment if he’s free? Nothing.
And what is this sentence? Here’s more detail:

Jurden also ordered Richards to “participate in a sex offenders” treatment program after his lawyer provided her with an evaluation from a clinic in Massachusetts. Her order stipulated that he undergo inpatient treatment followed by outpatient treatment. The judge also ordered him to have no contact with children under 16 and prohibited him from possessing pornography.

But of course who’s going to check? Why let him go free while in treatment? Why not lock him up? What if he’s never cured? He is a danger to children, but therapy and a promise not to go near children is enough? No. Lock him up during treatment, and let him make promises after he completes it and is evaluated. Isn’t that how a non-rich offender would be treated? Look, I get that this guy probably suffers from “affluenza”, it’s just that I don’t think that’s an excuse to avoid prison.
It appears the only thing the judge is worried about is how this super rich guy will fare in prison. So, for caring more about him than for the victim, and for all future victims, Judge Jan Jurden is the Asshole of the Day.
It is Judge Jan Jurden’s firs time as Asshole of the Day, but not the first judge to be featured on the site. Previous judge winners were
Montana Judge Todd Baugh, who gutted a sentence for a statutory rapist saying the girl “looked much older” even though the rapist was her teacher who knew her age
Texas Judge Jean Boyd, who let the rich kid off after killing four people because his lawyer said he suffered from “affluenza”
Nevada Judge Brent Adams, who reduced a child molester’s sentence from life to one year after the fact
Full story: Raw Story

assholeofday:

Judge Jan Jurden, Asshole of the Day for March 31, 2014

by TeaPartyCat ()

What would it take to keep a man out of prison after he raped his 3-year-old daughter?

The answer should of course be NOTHING. But apparently is “lots and lots of inherited money”. Or at least that’s  Judge Jan Jurden’s answer:

A Superior Court judge who sentenced an heir to the du Pont fortune to probation for raping his 3-year-old daughter wrote in her order that he “will not fare well” in prison and suggested that he needed treatment instead of time behind bars, according to Delaware Online.

Court records show that in Judge Jan Jurden’s sentencing order for Robert H. Richards IV she considered unique circumstances when deciding his punishment for fourth-degree rape. Her observation that prison life would adversely affect Richards confused several criminal justice authorities in Delaware, who said that her view that treatment was a better idea than prison is typically used when sentencing drug addicts, not child rapists.

Jurden gave Richards, who had no previous criminal record, an eight-year prison term, but suspended all the prison time for probation.

“Defendant will not fare well in Level 5 [prison] setting,” she wrote in her order.

Someone who molests his own 3-year-old has a problem. And ignoring what justice demands here, or how unevenly it is enforced between rich and poor, or even between rich and anyone else, there’s a safety issue. Someone with this problem needs to be locked up and not released until there’s some reason to believe he no longer poses a threat to children. Oh, sure, it’s nice to insist on treatment, but what’s to stop him from molesting more children while he’s under treatment if he’s free? Nothing.

And what is this sentence? Here’s more detail:

Jurden also ordered Richards to “participate in a sex offenders” treatment program after his lawyer provided her with an evaluation from a clinic in Massachusetts. Her order stipulated that he undergo inpatient treatment followed by outpatient treatment. The judge also ordered him to have no contact with children under 16 and prohibited him from possessing pornography.

But of course who’s going to check? Why let him go free while in treatment? Why not lock him up? What if he’s never cured? He is a danger to children, but therapy and a promise not to go near children is enough? No. Lock him up during treatment, and let him make promises after he completes it and is evaluated. Isn’t that how a non-rich offender would be treated? Look, I get that this guy probably suffers from “affluenza”, it’s just that I don’t think that’s an excuse to avoid prison.

It appears the only thing the judge is worried about is how this super rich guy will fare in prison. So, for caring more about him than for the victim, and for all future victims, Judge Jan Jurden is the Asshole of the Day.

It is Judge Jan Jurden’s firs time as Asshole of the Day, but not the first judge to be featured on the site. Previous judge winners were

Full story: Raw Story

(via pallet-town-julie-brown)